You Don’t Have To Be Famous To Start Doing Things Your Way #IndustryTips

New artists are often compared to more established artists. This can spark a conversation to get you noticed, but only by growing and finding your way in the industry will you get seen as an entertainer in your own right. Very few artists are completely different from day one with no similarities to anyone else, but do you have to be famous before you can do things your way?

In the UK especially there’s always a new wave, subculture, or sound that everyone is jumping on for recognition. An artist looking to stand out, be it launching or restarting their career, can be confronted with the dilemma of standing by a unique style of their own or following the crowd. Each decision involves some level of risk especially if you decide to do something that has not been done before. But what risks are involved in finding out if the sound you strongly believe in will work for you? Tapping into current trends can gain you quick entry into the scene, however savvy artists have a much bigger plan. No matter what direction your music takes, trust your instincts, and follow through with a steady plan.

Read on…

It takes alot of self confidence to express something that may be unpopular. When things aren’t working out the easier option might be to just go with the crowd. However, getting creative and pushing artistic boundaries can put you in a unique position to create a niche of your own. Artists with a long term vision try new things and keep building on their successes by following a formula for what works. Playing by your own rules has a much bigger payoff when things do eventually work out.

Read more on thelinkup.com

Deb McKoy is the Founder and Consultant at Peppergrain Ltd, London, UK. She began her career as a recording artist, achieving success in the UK national charts before going on to help businesses and individuals maximise their brand. 

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Deb McKoy